Roscosmos Looks to Sell RD-191 Rocket Engines to India

RD-191 rocket engine. (Credit: Владислав Чёрный)

No longer able to export rocket engines to the United States, Roscomos is looking to India as a new market. RBC reports that the state corporation is exploring the possibility of supplying 10 RD-191 rocket engines manufactured by NPO Energomash to India over a five-year period beginning in 2024.

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New Roscosmos Boss Yuri Borisov Outlined Main Areas of Activity of Roscosmos at Army-2022 Forum

Yuri Borisov at the Army-2022 International Military-Technical Forum. (Credit: Roscosmos)

Rendered into English by Google Translate

MOSCOW (Roscosmos PR) — At the opening of the Army-2022 International Military-Technical Forum, Yuri Borisov, General Director of the State Corporation Roscosmos, named the main areas of activity of the space industry.

“Dear colleagues, friends!

I am glad to welcome you to the main military-technical forum of Russia!

Ahead of us are several days of a rich and extensive program demonstrating the achievements of Russian enterprises, design centers and bureaus, as well as the huge potential of our engineers and workers.

This year the forum is taking place in very difficult foreign policy conditions, so we decided to focus on three extremely important aspects of our work.

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Roscosmos’ Keldysh Center Unveils Hall Engines for GEOsats and Space Tugs at Army-2022 Forum

Display of Keldysh Center engine technology. (Credit: Roscosmos)

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MOSCOW (Roscosmos PR) — The Keldysh Center (part of the Roscosmos State Corporation) presented correction systems for heavy geostationary spacecraft based on the KM-75 Hall engines and ID-200KR ion engines at the Army-2022 International Military-Technical Forum. The center also unveiled an electric propulsion system based on the KM-10 Hall engine for space stations and tugs at the forum.

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Roscosmos Director General Yuri Borisov Discussed Prospects for Creation of the Russian Orbital Station with Cosmonauts

Roscosmos Director General Yuri Borisov examines a spacesuit. (Credit: Roscosmos)

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MOSCOW (Roscosmos PR) — Roscosmos Director General Yuri Borisov, during a visit to the Cosmonaut Training Center, discussed with the cosmonaut corps the future of Russia’s manned program, including the creation of the Russian Orbital Station.

“Some of you will open the way to the Russian Orbital Station,” said Borisov, addressing the cosmonauts.

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Roscosmos Enterprise and Russian Defense Ministry Sign Contract for Supply of Latest Sarmat Missiles

JSC Makeyev Design Bureau CEO Vladimir Degtyar and Deputy Minister of Defense Alexei Krivoruchko at the signing of a contract for production of Sarmat ballistic missiles. (Credit: Roscosmos)

MOSCOW (Roscosmos PR) — The Ministry of Defense of Russia and the JSC Makeyev Design Bureau (part of the Roscosmos State Corporation) signed a contract for the supply of the latest Sarmat intercontinental ballistic missiles at the Army-2022 International Military-Technical Forum.

On the part of the Russian defense department, the contract was signed by the Deputy Minister of Defense of Russia Alexei Krivoruchko, and on the part of the Makeyev Design Bureau, CEO Vladimir Degtyar.

At present, the Makeev SRC, together with cooperation enterprises, is completing work on the creation of the Sarmat strategic missile system.

The Sarmat missile is a unique weapon that has characteristics that allow it to carry a wide variety of warheads of various capacities and for various purposes. The first flight design tests of the Sarmat ICBM took place on April 20, 2022. This date has become an important milestone in the rearmament of the Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces.

Roscosmos Presented Model of New Russian Orbital Station at Army-2022 Forum

Russian Orbital Service Station (ROSS) model. (Credit: Roscosmos)

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MOSCOW (Roscosmos PR) — On Monday, August 15, 2022, the Roscosmos State Corporation, during the Army-2022 International Military-Technical Forum, for the first time showed the public a mock-up of the new Russian orbital station.

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The Past Week in Launches: SpaceX & China Launch Twice, a Soyuz Rideshare and India Falls Short

Small Satellite Launch Vehicle lifts off on maiden flight. (Credit: ISRO)

by Douglas Messier
Managing Editor

During the past week, SpaceX launched 98 Starlink satellites, a Chinese commercial launch provider made it three in a row, Russia launched a rideshare mission with an Iranian satellite aboard, and India’s new small satellite launcher fell just short of orbit.

There have been 103 orbital launches worldwide, with 99 successes and four failures.

Let’s take a closer look at the last week in launch.

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The Best Laid Plans, Moscow Edition: Ukraine Invasion Damages Russia’s Launch Business

Soyuz-2 rocket launches a military satellite from Plesetsk Cosmodrome. (Credit: Russian Ministry of Defense)

by Douglas Messier
Managing Editor

Ambitious launch schedules typically go awry when a rocket suffers a catastrophic failure that takes months to investigate and implement modifications to ensure the same accident doesn’t happen again. In the majority of cases, the failures involve a machine launching a machine. All that can be replaced, albeit at substantial cost.

Russia’s ambitious launch plans for 2022 fell apart due to a far more momentous and deadly action: the nation’s invasion of Ukraine. The decision ruptured cooperation with the West on virtually every space project on which it was safe to do so. The main exception was the International Space Station (ISS), a program involving astronauts and cosmonauts that would be difficult to operate safely if Russia suddenly withdrew (as it indeed threatened to do).

Due to the invasion, Western partners canceled seven launches of foreign payloads in less than a month. The cancellations put Russia even further behind the United States and China in launch totals this year.

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New Roscosmos GD Says Russia to Leave ISS Program After 2024

Russian Orbital Service Station (Credit: Roscosmos)

The new head of Roscosmos says that Russia will leave the International Space Station program after 2024. The Associated Press reports:

Yuri Borisov, appointed this month to lead the state space agency, Roscosmos, said during a meeting with President Vladimir Putin that Russia will fulfill its obligations to its partners before it leaves.

“The decision to leave the station after 2024 has been made,” Borisov said, adding: “I think that by that time we will start forming a Russian orbiting station.”

Borisov’s statement reaffirmed previous declarations by Russian space officials about Moscow’s intention to leave the space station after 2024 when the current international arrangements for its operation end.

Roscosmos previously announced that it would build the Russian Orbital Service Station (ROSS) after it leaves ISS.

Russia keeps the station supplied with crews and cargo via Soyuz and Progress spacecraft, respectively. Progress resupply ships raise the station’s orbit and maneuvers the facility to avoid space debris. The Russian section of ISS is about one quarter of the orbiting laboratory.

The United States wants to keep the station operating until 2030. It wants U.S. industry to develop private space stations later in the 2020’s on which the space agency could become a tenant.

ISS is a partnership of NASA, European Space Agency (ESA), Canadian Space Agency (CSA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The four space agencies are partners in the NASA-led Artemis program that plans to return astronauts to the surface of the moon later in this decade.

NASA ISS Program Director Robyn Gatens said the space agency has received no formal notice about Russia withdrawing from the program during an appearance at the International Space Station Research and Development Conference in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday.

Commercial Space Travelers Outnumbered Professional Astronauts in First Half of 2022

Axiom Mission 1 astronauts, left to right, Larry Connor, Mark Pathy, Michael López-Alegría, and Eytan Stibbe. The astronauts are approved by NASA and its international partners for Axiom Space’s first private astronaut mission to the International Space Station. (Credits: Chris Gunn – Axiom Space)

by Douglas Messier
Managing Editor

The first half of 2022 saw more commercial travelers — 16 — launch into space than the 10 professional astronauts who work for government-run space agencies. However, those numbers come with an asterisk or two.

Four of the 14 astronauts who launched into orbit flew on Axiom Space’s privately funded and operated crew flight to the International Space Station (ISS). Blue Origin launched 12 individuals into space on two flights of the company’s New Shepard suborbital vehicle.

The other 10 astronauts who launched to ISS and the Tiangong space station worked fulltime for NASA, European Space Agency (ESA), China Manned Space Agency, or Russia’s Roscosmos State Space Corporation. SpaceX flew American and European astronauts to ISS on the company-owned Crew Dragon spacecraft under a NASA contract. The Russians and Chinese flew aboard government-owned and operated spacecraft.

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UAE Pilot Assigned to Crew-6 Space Station Mission

Sultan AlNeyadi (Credit: NASA)

HOUSTON (NASA PR) — The final crew member for NASA’s SpaceX Crew-6 mission, currently targeted to launch to the International Space Station in spring 2023, has been announced. The Mohammed bin Rashid Space Center of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) named Sultan AlNeyadi to spend approximately six months aboard the space station as part of Expeditions 68/69. Mission Specialist AlNeyadi joins NASA astronauts Stephen Bowen and Woody Hoburg, who will serve as spacecraft commander and pilot, respectively, for the mission, and cosmonaut Andrei Fedyaev of Roscosmos.

To ensure continuous U.S. presence aboard the International Space Station, NASA signed a contract in 2021 with Axiom Space to fly a NASA astronaut on a Soyuz rotation in exchange for a seat on a future U.S. commercial spacecraft. Axiom announced an agreement on April 29, 2022, with the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Center of the UAE to fly its crew member in the seat.

The UAE astronaut corps has been in training with NASA at the Johnson Space Center since 2019, including spacewalk training, onboard systems and T-38 training. AlNeyadi will continue crewmember training for the Dragon spacecraft and international partner segments.

77 Launches Conducted During First Half of 2022 as Access to Orbit Expanded

Falcon 9 launches 53 Starlink satellites while the Dragon that will carry Crew-4 to the International space Station awaits its turn. (Credit: SpaceX)

by Douglas Messier
Managing Editor

It was a busy first half of 2022 that saw 77 orbital launches with 74 successes and three failures through the 182nd day of the year on July 1. At a rate of one launch every 2 days 8 hours 44 minutes, the world is on track to exceed the 146 launches conducted in 2021.

A number of significant missions were launched during a period that saw more than 1,000 satellite launched. SpaceX flew the first fully commercial crewed mission to the International Space Station (ISS), Boeing conducted an orbital flight test of its CST-100 Starliner spacecraft, China prepared to complete assembly of its space station, South Korea launched its first domestically manufactured rocket, and Rocket Lab sent a NASA mission to the moon.

Let’s take a closer look at the numbers.

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NASA, Roscosmos Complete Seat Swap on Flights to ISS

The space station is viewed from the SpaceX Cargo Dragon during its automated approach before docking. (Credit: NASA TV)

HOUSTON (NASA PR) — To ensure continued safe operations of the International Space Station (station), protect the lives of astronauts, and ensure continuous U.S. presence in space, NASA will resume integrated crews on U.S. crew spacecraft and the Russian Soyuz with the Russian State Space Corporation Roscosmos.

Flying integrated crews ensures there are appropriately trained crew members on board the station for essential maintenance and spacewalks. It also protects against contingencies such as a problem with any crew spacecraft, serious crew medical issues, or an emergency aboard the station that requires a crew and the vehicle they are assigned to return to Earth sooner than planned.

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Rogozin Out as Roscosmos Chief

Roscosmos head Dmitry Rogozin. (Credit: A. Savin)

Dmitry Rogozin has been removed from his post as director general of the Roscosmos, the state corporation that runs Russia’s space program, according to press reports. Rogozin is being replaced by former Deputy Prime Minister Yuri Borisov.

Rogozin was appointed head of Roscosmos in May 2018. He was previously deputy prime minister overseeing the military-industrial complex, which included the space and defense sectors. Borisov replaced him in that role at the time.

Rogozin has been increasingly bombastic since the Russian invasion of Ukraine earlier this year. He made threats that Russia would launch nuclear weapons at nations supporting Ukraine. Rogozin also said Russia would pull out of the International Space Station program, which is a partnership of the United States, Europe, Japan and Canada.

Rogozin got into Twitter fights with a number of former NASA astronauts, who had nothing good to say about his tenure leading Russia’s space program.

Although he is out at Roscosmos, Rogozin’s career in the Russian government doesn’t appear to be over, according to Anatoly Zak of RussianSpaceWeb.com.

“Following its tumultuous tenure as the head of Roskosmos, Rogozin was expected to move to the presidential administration and, possibly, lead it or ‘curate’ the Russian occupation of the Eastern Ukraine, the independent Meduza publication reported,” Zak wrote.

BRICS Nations Form Joint Committee on Space Cooperation

BEIJING (China Ministry of Foreign Affairs PR) — On May 25, the 1st meeting of the BRICS Joint Committee on Space Cooperation was successfully held virtually, marking the official establishment of the BRICS Joint Committee on Space Cooperation and opening the new chapter for joint observation and data sharing cooperation of BRICS Remote Sensing Satellite Constellation (RSSC).

Mr. ZHANG Kejian, Administrator of the China National Space Administration (CNSA), served as the chairman of the Joint Committee this year. Mr. Carlos Augusto Teixeira de Moura, President of the Brazilian Space Agency (AEB), Mr. Dmitry Rogozin, Director General of the State Space Corporation “Roscosmos”(ROSCOSMOS), Mr. Somanath S. , Chairman of the Indian Space Research Organization, and Mr. Hendrik Burger, Representative of the South African National Space Agency, attended the meeting.

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