Report Lays Out Ambitious Plan for British Space Sector

SPACE IGT PRESS RELEASE

Today, the Space Innovation and Growth Team (Space IGT), a joint collaboration between industry, Government, and academia, set out a 20 year vision for the UK to grow its share of the quickly expanding global space market from 6% to 10%. The majority of investment required for what will be a six-fold increase in the size of the UK’s space sector will come from industry, but Government must also play a full part in this by doubling its spend on space.

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Harwell Set to Become UK’s Space Exploration Headquarters

Harwell lined up to be country’s space exploration centre
Herald Series


Harwell could become the country’s space exploration capital if a new national space agency is built in the area.

Science Minister Lord Drayson announced the creation of a new British space agency to co-ordinate research while visiting the Rutherford Appleton Space Conference at Harwell.

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The Space Review: Human Mars Missions, Fuel Depots and Britons in Space

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The Space Review features the following essays:

Why is human Mars exploration so surprisingly hard?
James Oberg discusses why human Mars missions have proven far more difficult than originally envisioned and how we’ll know that we’re finally ready to go.

Doubts about depots
Josh Hopkins argues that proponents of on-orbit propellant depots need to address a number of technical and business issues regarding them.

Ares 1 launch abort: technical analysis and policy implications
An Air Force analysis leaked last month concludes that there are phases of flight of the Ares 1 from which the Orion capsule could not safely escape. Kirk Woellert examines both the rationale for leaking the report and its technical merits.

Remembering the lessons of SEI
Taylor Dinerman looks back on the late, lamented Space Exploration Initiative for insights on how the President and Congress should not to act when given the Augustine Commission’s report.

Launch failure
Dwayne Day reflects on what the passing of LAUNCH Magazine means for space journalism, online and in print.

The crucible of man
Andrew Weston makes the case for Britain to be even more ambitious with its long-term space goals.

Review: Heavenly Ambitions
Jeff Foust reviews a new book that examines changes in space policy and explains why military space dominance is problematic, at best.



British Space Program Advances with Space Center, ExoMars and Moonlite

The British space program got a major boost this week when European space ministers approved the establishment of the agency’s first research center in the UK. The facility on the Harwell innovation campus in Oxfordshire will focus on climate change and space robotics research.

“It’s important. It shows renewed interest for Britain to be part of ESA, to be involved in space activity; and we welcome that,” Senior ESA executive Daniel Sacotte told BBC News. “It’s a new development in our relationship with this very important member state.”

Meanwhile, British scientists will be going interplanetary with missions to the moon and Mars.

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