Chang’e 4 Lander and the Yutu 2 Lunar Rover Awakened Autonomously and Entered 21st Day Work Period

Chang’e-4 mission photo of lunar far side. (Credit: CNSA)

BEIJING (CNSA PR) — On the far side of the moon, with a new round of dawn, the Chang’e 4 lander and the Yutu 2 lunar rover ended their moon night dormancy at 14:54 on August 13 and 20:34 on August 12, respectively.

Wake up spontaneously by light and enter the 21st day working period. The working conditions of the two instruments are normal, the energy is balanced, and the exploration journey on the back of the moon continues.

According to the panoramic camera stitched image, DOM image and other data, the Yutu-2 lunar rover will drive to the basalt or high-reflectivity impact crater area northwest of the current detection point during the daytime work period of this month. 

Chang’e-4 mission photo of lunar far side. (Credit: CNSA)

At that time, the panoramic camera, infrared imaging spectrometer, and central atom detector will be turned on for detection, and the moon-measuring radar will carry out simultaneous detection during driving.

In addition, the Yutu-2 lunar rover plans to choose an opportunity to carry out panoramic ring shooting in the higher terrain at the junction of the two impact craters (the edge of the degraded impact crater).

Yutu 2 Reveals Possible Causes of Unknown Gelatinous Substance on Moon

Yutu-2 lunar rover near an impact crater. (Credit: China National Space Administration)

BEIJING (China National Space Administration PR) — Since landing on the back of the moon, the Chang’e 4 lander and the Yutu-2 lunar rover have been operating successfully for more than 500 days, and have achieved many results in the scientific fields such as the material composition and underground structure of the landing zone.

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Chang’e-4 Enters 18th Lunar Night, Data Reveals Composition of Lunar Soil

Chang’e-4 lunar surface photo. (Credit: China National Space Administration)

BEIJING (China National Space Administration PR) — The Chang’e 4 lander and the Yutu 2 lunar rover completed their eighteenth day and night work at 17:00 and 7:15 on May 29, respectively, and completed the moon night mode setting according to the ground instructions, and entered the moon night sleep.

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Chang’e-4 Exceeds 400 Days & 400 Meters on Far Side of the Moon

China’s Yutu 2 rover drives off the Chang’e-4 lander. (Credit: CNSA)

BEIING (China National Space Administration PR) — On the far side of the distant moon, after 14 days of moonlight, the sun shone again on the Chang’e 4 lander and the Yutu 2 lunar rover, and the Chang’e 4 lander and the Yutu 2 lunar rover returned to work.

Awakened independently on March 18, and entered the 16th day work period. The ground was confirmed to be in good condition and the working conditions were normal, and a new round of scientific detection was carried out as planned. “Yutu No. 2” lunar rover traveled to the new target point and started exploring again on the back of the moon.

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China’s Chang’e 6 to Deploy French DORN Instrument on Moon to Study Lunar Exosphere

BEIJING (CNES PR) — Wednesday 6 November, on the occasion of President Emmanuel Macron’s state visit to the People’s Republic of China, CNES President Jean-Yves Le Gall and Zhang Kejian, Administrator of the China National Space Administration (CNSA), signed in the presence of Presidents Macron and Xi Jinping a joint statement covering two fields of investigation.

First, in 2023 China’s Chang’e 6 lunar mission will fly the French DORN instrument proposed by the IRAP astrophysics and planetology research institute. DORN’s science goals are to study the transport of volatiles through the lunar regolith and in the lunar exosphere and lunar dust.

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China Lands Chang’e-4 on Far Side of the Moon

China’s Yutu 2 rover drives off the Chang’e-4 lander. (Credit: CNSA)

China made history on Thursday with the first soft landing on the far side of the moon.

Chang’e-4 successfully touched down in the South Pole–Aitken basin and later deployed the Yutu 2 rover. It was China’s second successful landing on the moon after Chang’e-3 touched down on the near side and deployed a rover in December 2013.

The lander includes the following payloads:

  • landing and terrain cameras;
  • a low-frequency spectrometer;
  • a neutrons and dosimetry (LND) dosimeter supplied by Kiel University in Germany;
  • a container with silkworm eggs and seeds of potatoes and Arabidopsis thaliana; and,
  • a miniature camera to record the growth of the eggs and seeds.

A view of the moon from the Chang’e-4 lander. (Credit: CNSA)

The rover’s payloads include:

  • a panoramic camera;
  • a lunar penetrating radar system;
  • a visible and near-infrared imaging spectrometer; and,
  • and an advanced small analyzer for neutrals (ASAN) provided by the Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF) to measure the interaction of the solar winds with the lunar surface.

The lander and rover will communicate with the Chang’e 4 relay satellite, which was launched last year.