How a Vibration Problem in Ares I Could Cut the Cost of Off-Shore Wind Power

The uncrewed Ares I-X prototype launched in October 2009 on a successful test flight, but the rocket caused vibrations that would have been dangerous to humans on board. Engineers at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center came up with a solution using the mass of hydrogen fuel in the second-stage rocket. (Credits: NASA)

by Naomi Seck
NASA’s Spinoff Publication

When we run into a snag designing a new space vehicle, it can be frustrating for the engineers, scientists, and technologists who have spent months and years getting to that point – but it’s also an opportunity for the team to spring into action and innovate a solution.

That’s just what happened with the Ares I, a previous rocket development effort for destinations including the Moon. Though NASA ultimately decided not to continue Ares development, a revolutionary device created to fix a vibration challenge in the rocket is still going strong, and its latest version is set to make offshore wind power more efficient and affordable.

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Mojave Update: Stu Witt Declares War on…

The wind turbines outside of Mojave appear vaguely menacing in a Transformers sort of way at dusk. Within a few minutes, their blinding Cylon Centaurian-style red warning beacons will be turned on, annoying pilots and residents alike for the rest of the evening. (Credit: Douglas Messier)

By Douglas Messier
Parabolic Arc Managing Editor

…light pollution caused by wind turbines!

You didn’t see that one coming, did ya?

Well, nobody ever expects light pollution. Or the Spanish Inquisition! (Da da dum!)

But, I digress.

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