NOAA’s GOES-T Weather Satellite Blasts into Orbit

A ULA Atlas V rocket carrying the GOES-T mission for NOAA and NASA lifts off from Space Launch Complex-41 at 4:38 p.m. EST on March 1. (Credit: ULA)

New satellite will support weather forecasts for the U.S. West Coast, Hawaii and Alaska

SILVER SPRING, Md. (NOAA PR) — NOAA’s GOES-T, the third in a series of four advanced geostationary weather satellites, blasted into orbit aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket at 4:38 p.m. ET today from Cape Canaveral, Florida. GOES-T’s mission managers confirmed that its solar arrays successfully deployed at 8:28 p.m. EST, and the satellite was operating on its own power.

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NASA TV to Air NOAA’s GOES-T Launch, Prelaunch Activities

Illustration of the GOES-T spacecraft with Earth’s reflection. (Credits: Lockheed Martin)

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — NASA will provide coverage of the prelaunch and launch activities of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) next weather observing and environmental monitoring system satellite. Currently known as GOES-T, this is the third satellite in NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) – R series.

GOES-T is scheduled to launch at 4:38 p.m. EST Tuesday, March 1, on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. There is a two-hour launch window.

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NOAA Harnessing Power of New Satellite Data this Hurricane Season

Hurricane Humberto (Credit: NOAA)

SILVER SPRING, Md. (NOAA PR) — With predictions for an above-normal 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, NOAA forecasters have added meteorological muscle from a new  combination of satellite data flowing into its computer models. 

The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC-2) is a new fleet of six small satellites launched last June. Since May 26, the constellation has begun feeding more than 4,000 vertical sets of measurements of atmospheric temperature and humidity in the tropics and subtropics daily into our forecast models. Measuring the moisture in and around tropical cyclones is important because it is a key ingredient for their development and intensification.

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COSMIC-2 Brings Data Boost to NOAA

https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/content/cosmic-2-brings-data-boost-noaa

Artist’s rendering of a COSMIC-2 satellite. (Credit: NOAA)

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — A fleet of six small satellites, designed to improve weather prediction and space weather monitoring, are now officially providing data to NOAA that will soon be incorporated into their forecast models, agency officials said today.

The satellites, which were launched last June and completed a seven-month instrument and data evaluation process, make up the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC-2).

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