Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is Waaay Too Modest

This enhanced-color image of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Jason Major using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft. (Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Jason Major)

This Thing is Effin’ Awesome, Man! Thanks Juno!

JUPITER ORBIT (NASA PR) — Images of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot reveal a tangle of dark, veinous clouds weaving their way through a massive crimson oval. The JunoCam imager aboard NASA’s Juno mission snapped pics of the most iconic feature of the solar system’s largest planetary inhabitant during its Monday (July 10) flyby. The images of the Great Red Spot were downlinked from the spacecraft’s memory on Tuesday and placed on the mission’s JunoCam website Wednesday morning.

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NASA’s Juno to Remain in Current Orbit at Jupiter

NASA’s Juno spacecraft soared directly over Jupiter’s south pole when JunoCam acquired this image on February 2, 2017 at 6:06 a.m. PT (9:06 a.m. ET), from an altitude of about 62,800 miles (101,000 kilometers) above the cloud tops. (Credit: NASA)

PASADENA, Calif. (NASA PR) — NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter, which has been in orbit around the gas giant since July 4, 2016, will remain in its current 53-day orbit for the remainder of the mission. This will allow Juno to accomplish its science goals, while avoiding the risk of a previously-planned engine firing that would have reduced the spacecraft’s orbital period to 14 days.

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NASA Postpones Orbit Changing Burn for Juno

NASA’s solar-powered Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter on July 4, 2016. (Credit: NASA)
NASA’s solar-powered Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter on July 4, 2016. (Credit: NASA)

PASADENA, Calif. (NASA PR) — Mission managers for NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter have decided to postpone the upcoming burn of its main rocket motor originally scheduled for Oct. 19. This burn, called the period reduction maneuver (PRM), was to reduce Juno’s orbital period around Jupiter from 53.4 to 14 days. The decision was made in order to further study the performance of a set of valves that are part of the spacecraft’s fuel pressurization system. The period reduction maneuver was the final scheduled burn of Juno’s main engine.

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NASA’s Juno Successfully Completes Jupiter Flyby

Jupiter's north polar region is coming into view as NASA's Juno spacecraft approaches the giant planet. This view of Jupiter was taken on August 27, when Juno was 437,000 miles (703,000 kilometers) away. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS)
Jupiter’s north polar region is coming into view as NASA’s Juno spacecraft approaches the giant planet. This view of Jupiter was taken on August 27, when Juno was 437,000 miles (703,000 kilometers) away. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS)

PASADENA, Calif. (NASA PR) — NASA’s Juno mission successfully executed its first of 36 orbital flybys of Jupiter today. The time of closest approach with the gas-giant world was 6:44 a.m. PDT (9:44 a.m. EDT, 13:44 UTC) when Juno passed about 2,600 miles (4,200 kilometers) above Jupiter’s swirling clouds. At the time, Juno was traveling at 130,000 mph (208,000 kilometers per hour) with respect to the planet. This flyby was the closest Juno will get to Jupiter during its prime mission.

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Juno Approach Movie of Jupiter and the Galilean Moons

Video Caption: NASA’s Juno spacecraft captured a unique time-lapse movie of the Galilean satellites in motion about Jupiter. The movie begins on June 12th with Juno 10 million miles from Jupiter, and ends on June 29th, 3 million miles distant.

The innermost moon is volcanic Io; next in line is the ice-crusted ocean world Europa, followed by massive Ganymede, and finally, heavily cratered Callisto. Galileo observed these moons to change position with respect to Jupiter over the course of a few nights.

From this observation he realized that the moons were orbiting mighty Jupiter, a truth that forever changed humanity’s understanding of our place in the cosmos. Earth was not the center of the Universe. For the first time in history, we look upon these moons as they orbit Jupiter and share in Galileo’s revelation. This is the motion of nature’s harmony.

NASA’s Juno Spacecraft Enters Orbit Around Jupiter

Juno team members celebrate after they received confirmation from the spacecraft that it has successfully entered orbit of Jupiter, Monday, July 4, 2016 in mission control of the Space Flight Operations Facility at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA. The Juno mission launched August 5, 2011 and will orbit the planet for 20 months to collect data on the planetary core, map the magnetic field, and measure the amount of water and ammonia in the atmosphere. (Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)
Juno team members celebrate after they received confirmation from the spacecraft that it has successfully entered orbit of Jupiter, Monday, July 4, 2016 in mission control of the Space Flight Operations Facility at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA. The Juno mission launched August 5, 2011 and will orbit the planet for 20 months to collect data on the planetary core, map the magnetic field, and measure the amount of water and ammonia in the atmosphere. (Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

PASADENA, Calif. (NASA PR) — After an almost five-year journey to the solar system’s largest planet, NASA’s Juno spacecraft successfully entered Jupiter’s orbit during a 35-minute engine burn. Confirmation that the burn had completed was received on Earth at 8:53 p.m. PDT (11:53 p.m. EDT) Monday, July 4.

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Ringing in the Fourth of July with Juno at NASA JPL

Fourth_of_July_firework
Happy Fourth of July!

I’m at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory today where the space agency will attempt to put the Juno spacecraft in orbit around Jupiter this evening.

NASA’s solar-powered Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter on July 4, 2016. (Credit: NASA)
NASA’s solar-powered Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter on July 4, 2016. (Credit: NASA)

Mission commentary begins at 7:30 p.m. PDT. A 35-minute main engine burn is set to begin at 8:18 p.m. and conclude at 8:53 p.m. Watch the proceedings live at www.nasa.gov.

I’m be Tweeting @ www.twitter.com/spacecom

Please follow along.

Juno to Enter Orbit Around Jupiter on July 4

NASA's Juno Spacecraft Enters Jupiter's Magnetic Field NASA's Juno spacecraft obtained this color view on June 28, 2016, at a distance of 3.9 million miles (6.2 million kilometers) from Jupiter. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS)
NASA’s Juno spacecraft obtained this color view on June 28, 2016, at a distance of 3.9 million miles (6.2 million kilometers) from Jupiter. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS)MISSION STATUS REPORT

As of noon (Pacific time) today, July 2, NASA’s Juno mission was 1.79 million miles (2.88 million kilometers) from Jupiter — and closing. The solar-powered spacecraft will cross the orbit of the outermost Galilean moon, Callisto, on July 3 at about 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT). The orbits of Ganymede, Europa and Io (the other Galilean moons), will be crossed on July 4 at about 4 a.m. PDT (7 a.m. EDT), 10:30 a.m. PDT (1:30 p.m. EDT) and 2:15 p.m. PDT (5:15 p.m. EDT) respectively. These four largest moons of Jupiter are named the Galilean moons because they were discovered by Galileo Galilei in 1609.

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NASA’s Juno Spacecraft Enters Jupiter’s Magnetic Field

NASA's Juno Spacecraft Enters Jupiter's Magnetic Field NASA's Juno spacecraft obtained this color view on June 28, 2016, at a distance of 3.9 million miles (6.2 million kilometers) from Jupiter. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS)
NASA’s Juno Spacecraft Enters Jupiter’s Magnetic Field
NASA’s Juno spacecraft obtained this color view on June 28, 2016, at a distance of 3.9 million miles (6.2 million kilometers) from Jupiter. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS)

PASADENA, Calif. (NASA PR) — NASA’s Jupiter-bound Juno spacecraft has entered the planet’s magnetosphere, where the movement of particles in space is controlled by what’s going on inside Jupiter.

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Celebrate the Fourth With NASA at Jupiter

NASA’s solar-powered Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter on July 4, 2016. (Credit: NASA)
NASA’s solar-powered Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter on July 4, 2016. (Credit: NASA)

PASADENA, Calif. (NASA PR) — This Fourth of July, NASA’s solar-powered Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter after an almost five-year journey. News briefings, photo opportunities and other media events will be held at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, and air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

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NASA Moves Ahead With Juno Mission to Jupiter

NASA MISSION UPDATE

NASA is officially moving forward on a mission to conduct an unprecedented, in-depth study of Jupiter.

Called Juno, the mission will be the first in which a spacecraft is placed in a highly elliptical polar orbit around the giant planet to understand its formation, evolution and structure. Underneath its dense cloud cover, Jupiter safeguards secrets to the fundamental processes and conditions that governed our early solar system.

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