Former Congressman Culberson Joins National Space Council Users’ Advisory Group

John Culberson

Vice President Mike Pence has nominated former Congressman John Culberson and four other people to serve two-year terms on National Space Council Users’ Advisory Group. Four current members are leaving the board.

“The nominated members of the Users’ Advisory Group will serve to fulfill President Trump’s directive to ‘foster close coordination, cooperation, and technology and information exchange’ across our nation’s space enterprise to ensure that the United States remains the world’s foremost spacefaring country,” the White House said in a press release.

Nominees are pending official appointment by NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine.

New Members

John Culberson
Former U.S. Congressman, Texas

Eileen Drake
President and CEO, Aerojet Rocketdyne

Dr. Bruce Jakosky
Professor of Atmosphere and Space Physics, University of Colorado

Jeanette Nuñez
Lieutenant Governor of Florida
Chairwoman of the Board, Space Florida

James D. Taiclet, Jr.
Board member, Lockheed Martin Corporation
Takes over as President and CEO on June 15

Departing Members

Marillyn Hewson
President and CEO, Lockheed Martin
Retiring on June 15

David Thompson
Former President and CEO, Orbital ATK

Steve Crisafulli
Former Speaker, Florida House of Representatives

Eric Schmidt
Former CEO and Executive Chairman, Google

Current Members

Admiral James Ellis, Jr., USN, Retired
Chairman, Users’ Advisory Group

Former Commander, United States Strategic Command, member of the Space Foundation Board of Directors

Dr. Buzz Aldrin, USAF, Retired
Apollo 11 astronaut

Tory Bruno
President and CEO, United Launch Alliance

David Calhoun
President and CEO, The Boeing Company

Dean Cheng
Scholar at the Heritage Foundation

Colonel Eileen Collins, USAF, Retired
Four-time shuttle astronaut, first female shuttle commander

Dr. Mary Lynne Dittmar
President and CEO, Coalition for Deep Space Exploration

Tim Ellis
CEO, Relativity Space

Homer Hickam
Board Member, U. S. Space & Rocket Center; former NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center engineer; Author of “Rocket Boys”

The Honorable Kay Ivey
Governor of Alabama

Fred Klipsch
Board of Trustees, Marian University;
Chairman and CEO, Klipsch Audio Technologies, Retired

General Les Lyles, USAF, Retired
Chairman, NASA Advisory Council

Colonel Pam Melroy, USAF, Retired
Three-time shuttle astronaut, former Deputy Director of the Tactical Technology Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Fatih Ozmen
CEO, Sierra Nevada Corporation

Harrison H. Schmitt
Former United States Senator, New Mexico; Apollo 17 astronaut

Gwynne Shotwell
President and COO, SpaceX

Dr. Robert H. Smith
CEO, Blue Origin

Eric Stallmer
President, Commercial Spaceflight Federation

Pamela Vaughan
STEM Integration Specialist for the Arkansas Department of Education

Mandy Vaughn
President, VOX Space

Kathy Warden
Chairman, CEO, and President, Northrop Grumman Corporation

Stuart O. Witt
Former Navy pilot; founder, Mojave Air and Spaceport; former chairman of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation

David Wolf, M.D.
Four-time shuttle astronaut, Purdue University

Bridenstine Criticizes Uncontrolled Long March 5B Stage Reentry

by Douglas Messier
Managing Editor

In a statement on Friday, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said the uncontrolled reentry of the core stage from the recently launched Chinese Long March 5 could have fallen on U.S. cities before reentering over the Atlantic Ocean and west Africa.

“The empty core stage of the Long March 5B, weighing nearly 20 tons, was in an uncontrolled freefall along a path that carried it over Los Angeles and other populated areas. As a matter of fact, had this spent rocket stage, which is the largest uncontrolled object to fall from low-Earth orbit in almost 30 years, reentered earlier, it could have hit New York. Two villages in Cote d’Ivoire have reported finding what they believe to be debris from the fallen rocket.

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NASA Awards Lunar Lander Contracts to Blue Origin, Dynetics and SpaceX

Illustration of Artemis astronauts on the Moon. (Credits: NASA)

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — NASA has selected three U.S. companies to design and develop human landing systems (HLS) for the agency’s Artemis program, one of which will land the first woman and next man on the surface of the Moon by 2024. NASA is on track for sustainable human exploration of the Moon for the first time in history.

The human landing system awards under the Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP-2) Appendix H Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) are firm-fixed price, milestone-based contracts.  The total combined value for all awarded contracts is $967 million for the 10-month base period. 

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NASA to Announce Commercial Human Lander Awards for Artemis Moon Missions

Astronauts on a future lunar walk. (Credit: NASA)

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — NASA will host a media teleconference at 1 p.m. EDT Thursday, April 30, to announce the companies selected to develop modern human landing systems (HLS) that will carry the first woman and next man to the surface of the Moon by 2024 and develop sustainable lunar exploration by the end of the decade.

Audio of the call will stream online at:

https://www.nasa.gov/live

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NASA Administrator Statement on Passing of Former Administrator James Beggs

James Beggs, NASA’s sixth administrator (Credits: NASA)

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — The following is a statement from NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine on the passing of the agency’s sixth administrator, James Beggs, on April 23. Mr. Beggs served as NASA administrator from July 1981 to December 1985.

“NASA sends its condolences to the family of James Beggs. Mr. Beggs led the agency during the earliest days of the Space Shuttle Program and helped us open a whole new era of exploration. We continue to build on his legacy today as we take advantage of our long-term presence in low-Earth orbit to make the advances to travel farther, and seed an entirely new segment of the economy through the innovations of commercial partners.

“Mr. Beggs also served his country in the U.S. Navy and supported NASA’s achievements during the Apollo era during an agency tenure in the late 1960s. His legacy guided the shuttle program toward its three decades of achievements and set the stage for a diverse and flexible astronaut corps from which we continue to benefit. We salute his service and will continue to honor his contributions to our great agency.”

Read Mr. Beggs’ official agency biography at:

https://history.nasa.gov/Biographies/beggs.html

Read the transcript of an Oral History Project interview with Mr. Beggs, performed in March 2002, at:

https://go.nasa.gov/2Y6JeVM

NASA Contributes Expertise, Ingenuity to COVID-19 Fight

An employee works on the Aerospace Valley Positive Pressure Helmet, a device that was successfully tested by doctors at Antelope Valley Hospital in California. The Spaceship Company began producing 500 this week and a request was submitted April 22 to the FDA for an emergency use authorization. NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California partnered with Antelope Valley Hospital, the City of Lancaster, Virgin Galactic, The Spaceship Company (TSC), Antelope Valley College and members of the Antelope Valley Task Force to solve possible shortages of critical medical equipment in the local community. (Credits: NASA)

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — NASA has joined the fight against coronavirus (COVID-19) with efforts underway across the country to augment the national response, a few of which were highlighted in a media briefing today.

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NASA to Preview First Crewed Dragon Mission on May 1

On Thursday, March 19 and Friday, March 20, SpaceX teams in Firing Room 4 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida and the company’s Mission Control in Hawthorne, California, along with NASA flight controllers in Mission Control Houston, executed a full simulation of launch and docking of the Crew Dragon spacecraft, with NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley (front) participating in SpaceX’s flight simulator. (Credits: SpaceX)

HOUSTON (NASA PR) — With the first mission to return human spaceflight launches to American soil now targeted to lift off May 27, NASA will highlight the historic flight with a series of news conferences Friday, May 1, that will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s  website. In addition, NASA astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley, who will serve as crew for the mission, will be available for remote interviews.

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NASA Joins California Team to Develop COVID-19 Solutions

NASA engineer Mike Buttigieg works on an oxygen hood system prototype worn by Dr. Daniel Khodabakhsh from the Antelope Valley Hospital in California. The hood is designed to help coronavirus patients who don’t yet need a ventilator, but who are experiencing breathing troubles. The hood forces oxygen into patients with mild coronavirus symptoms, minimizing the likelihood that the patient will need to use a ventilator. (Credits: NASA/Carla Thomas)

EDWARDS, Calif. (NASA PR) — NASA has joined forces with a task force in Antelope Valley, in northern Los Angeles County, California, to build medical devices to help patients with coronavirus (COVID-19).

NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center partnered with Antelope Valley Hospital, the City of Lancaster, Virgin Galactic, The Spaceship Company (TSC), and Antelope Valley College to come up with innovative ideas to solve possible shortages of critical medical equipment.

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NASA Commemorates 50th Anniversary of Apollo 13, ‘A Successful Failure’

The crew members of the Apollo 13 mission, step aboard the USS Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the mission, following splashdown and recovery operations in the South Pacific Ocean on April 19, 1970. Exiting the helicopter are (from left) astronauts Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot; James A. Lovell Jr., commander; and John L. Swigert Jr., command module pilot. (Credits: NASA)

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — As NASA marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission – which has become known as “a successful failure” that saw the safe return of its crew in spite of a catastrophic explosion – the agency is sharing a variety of resources, recognizing the triumph of the mission control team and the astronauts, and looking at how those lessons learned can be applied to its lunar Artemis program.

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NASA Shares Findings, Recommendations, and Response to Review of International Space Station National Lab

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — An external team appointed by NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine has completed its review of the operations and management of the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory, which the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) manages.

The Independent Review Team (IRT) delivered its report to the agency in February, and NASA is now publicly releasing the report in full as well as the agency’s response to its recommendations.

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NASA Taps Workforce for Innovative Ideas for Coronavirus Response Efforts

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — For more than 60 years, NASA has overcome a range of unique challenges. Now, the agency is looking to leverage its expertise and capabilities to help the nation with the unprecedented challenge of coronavirus (COVID-19). To come up with new, innovative ideas for how NASA can best contribute to COVID-19 response efforts, the agency is tapping into the brainpower and creativity of its workforce.

On April 1, NASA launched an agencywide call for ideas on its internal crowdsourcing platform NASA @ WORK. The internal website fosters collaboration and provides NASA employees with an inventive way to share knowledge and solve challenges.

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More NASA Centers Go to Stage 4 as KSC Worker Tests Positive for Coronavirus

Jim Bridenstine (Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Message from NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine

Dear NASA family,

Our nation is fighting an invisible enemy – coronavirus (COVID-19). NASA is implementing important measures across the agency to do our part to help slow the transmission of COVID-19 and protect our communities. To continue NASA’s inspiring mission, the safety of our workforce is our top priority. We will not ask employees and contractors to perform work if we do not have the highest confidence that it is safe to do so.

Mission-Essential Work

Last week, NASA leadership completed the first agencywide assessment of what work can be performed remotely by employees at home, mission-essential work that must be performed on-site, and on-site work that will be paused. You can find the release here.

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NASA Leadership Assessing Mission Impacts of Coronavirus

WASHINGTON, March 20, 2020 (NASA PR) — To protect the health and safety of the NASA workforce as the nation responds to coronavirus (COVID-19), agency leadership recently completed the first assessment of work underway across all missions, projects, and programs. The goal was to identify tasks that can be done remotely by employees at home, mission-essential work that must be performed on-site, and on-site work that will be paused.

“We are going to take care of our people. That’s our first priority,” said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. “Technology allows us to do a lot of what we need to do remotely, but, where hands-on work is required, it is difficult or impossible to comply with CDC guidelines while processing spaceflight hardware, and where we can’t safely do that we’re going to have to suspend work and focus on the mission critical activities.” 

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