Beresheet Crashed Due to Errand Command Sent to Fix Problem

Beresheet lander (Credit: SpaceIL)

YEHUD, Israel, April 17, 2019 (SpaceIL PR) — According to preliminary investigation of the Israeli spacecraft Beresheet’s landing manuever, it appears that a manual command was entered into the spacecraft’s computer. This led to a chain reaction in the spacecraft, during which the main engine switched off, which prevent it from activating further.

SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) teams continue to investigate further, in order to understand the full picture of what occurred during the mission. In the coming weeks, final results of the investigation will be released.

SpaceIL President Mr. Morris Kahn said: “I am proud of SpaceIL’s team of engineers for their wonderful work and dedication, and such cases are an integral part of such a complex and pioneering project. What is important now is to learn the best possible lessons from our mistakes and bravely continue forward. That’s the message we’d like to convey to the people in Israel and the entire Jewish world. This is the spirit of the Beresheet project.”

Editor’s Note: The Jerusalem Post reports the command that was sent was intended to solve a problem that developed during descent:

A command intended to correct a malfunction in one of the Beresheet spacecraft’s inertial measurement unit (IMUs) led to a chain of events which turned off its main engine during landing, according to a preliminary investigation conducted by SpaceIL….

“There was no incident like this since the mission began,” Anteby told reporters. “After it occurred, an activation command was sent to [the IMU], causing a chain of events in which the main engine stopped and was unable to return to continuous operation.”

While the spacecraft attempted to restart its engine several times, the attempts proved unsuccessful.

Bersheet Hit Moon at 500 Km/h After Engine Failure

Beresheet lander (Credit: SpaceIL)

YEHUD, Israel, April 12, 2019 (SpaceIL PR) — Preliminary data supplied by the engineering teams of SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries (IA) suggests a technical glitch in one of Beresheet’s components triggered the chain of events yesterday that caused the main engine of the spacecraft to malfunction. Without the main engine working prop3erly, it was impossible to stop Beresheet’s velocity. Beresheet overcame the issue by restarting the engine. However, by that time, its velocity was too high to slow down and the landing could not be completed as planned.

Preliminary technical information collected by the teams shows that the first technical issue occurred at 14 kilometers (8.7 miles) above the moon. At 150 meters (492 feet) from the ground, when the connection with the spacecraft was lost completely, Beresheet was moving vertically at 500 km/h (310.7 miles) to the inevitable collision with the lunar surface. Comprehensive tests will be held next week to gain a better understanding of the events.

SpaceIL, IAI to Send Time Capsule to Moon on Nation’s First Lunar Mission

SpaceIL lander (Credit: SpaceIL)

The time capsule will include Israeli national, cultural and traditional symbols, such as Israel’s Declaration of Independence, Hebrew songs, the Wayfarer’s Prayer, and paintings by Israeli children.

TEL AVIV (IAI PR) — Israeli nonprofit SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) presented today at IAI’s Space Division a time capsule that will travel to the moon – and remain there indefinitely – with the first Israeli spacecraft, which will launch from Cape Canaveral, Florida, in February, 2019.

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OHB, IAI Team in Offering Commercial Lunar Surface Missions to ESA

  • Collaboration to be managed by OHB System AG, a leading German satellite manufacturer
  • IAI to deliver a lunar lander based on the engineering knowhow accumulated in the development of SpaceIL lunar lander

TEL AVIV (IAI PR) — OHB System AG, a leading German manufacturer of satellites and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), signed a teaming agreement today (Tuesday, 29.1.2019) at the Ilan Ramon Space Conference. Under the agreement, the companies will offer a commercial Lunar Surface Access Service (LSAS) for payloads up to 150 kg to the European Space Agency (ESA).

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Effective Space, IAI Announce Partnership on Satellite Servicing

Credit: Effective Space

PARIS (IAI PR) — IAI and Effective Space – a company pioneering last mile logistics in space – today announced that they have signed a term sheet for cooperation, including both technological and financial partnerships. Under the conditions of the term sheet,

Effective Space will appoint IAI as the primary contractor of its SPACE DRONETM spacecraft, while IAI will work to complete the necessary approvals for equity investment in Effective Space. The term sheet follows more than a year of cooperation, during which both companies have been jointly working on the SPACE DRONETM spacecraft design.

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IAI Files Lawsuit Over Lost Satellite

Falcon 9 explodes on the launch pad during fueling. (Credit: USLaunchReport.com)

The fallout from the explosion of a Falcon 9 on the launch pad in September 2016 continues with a dispute over an insurance payment, Globes reports.

Israel Aerospace Industries Ltd. (IAI) (TASE: ARSP.B1) today filed a NIS 300 million [$88 million] lawsuit at the Central District Court against Lloyd’s of London underwriters, the insurers of the Amos 6 satellite; Migdal Insurance and Financial Holdings Ltd. (TASE: MGDL) subsidiary Peltours Insurance Agency; and UK broker Marsh.The lawsuit involves the explosion of the Amos 6 satellite in September 2016 before its scheduled launch from Cape Canaveral, Florida, and the insurance compensation due to IAI from the satellite’s loss. Following the explosion of the satellite and negotiations between the parties, the insurers paid IAI $215 million in compensation. A dispute remains between the parties over the NIS 300 million not yet paid to IAI, for which a lawsuit has now been filed.

The insurers main argument is that the satellite exploded during a test of the launching rocket’s engines at a time when the satellite was connected to the rocket. They assert that they were not notified that the satellite would be attached to the rocket during the test, and that the insurance coverage should therefore be reduced by the increased rate of risk.

Through Advocates Ilan Sofer, Guy Wilf, and Jonathan Dori from the Goldfarb Seligman law firm, IAI is arguing that the explosion did not take place during a test of the engines, according to the statement by the SpaceX company, owned by Elon Musk, which was responsible for launching the satellite into outer space, and that by law and under the terms of the insurance policy, no notice was required, as claimed by the insurers.

 

FIMI Completes Control Acquisition Transactions in IAI’s ImageSat

LOD, Israel (IAI PR) — Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) announced today it has entered an agreement with FIMI, the largest Private Equity fund in Israel (FIMI). Pursuant to the agreement, FIMI shall invest $40 million in ImageSat International (ISI) in exchange for 53.6% of ISI’s share equity.

The agreement further stipulates that ISI shall buy the new observation satellite ‘EROS C’ from IAI and at the transaction closing date, shall pay IAI $35 million to cover part of the outstanding shareholder’s loan. The transaction will allot preferred stock to FIMI with a distribution agreement between IAI and FIMI. The deal is pending approval by the Israeli Ministry of Defense and the Antitrust Authority.

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Vega Orbits OPTSAT-3000 and Venµs Satellites

Veta lifts off with OPTSAT-3000 and Venµs aboard. (Credit: Arianespace)

KOUROU, French Guiana (Arianespace PR) — For the second time this year – and the 10th overall since entering service in 2012 – Vega has successfully launched a payload from the Spaceport, with this lightweight vehicle’s latest mission delivering the OPTSAT-3000 and Venµs Earth observation satellites to Sun-synchronous orbits.

Lifting off from the Spaceport’s SLV launch complex at precisely 10:58:33 p.m. French Guiana time on August 1, Vega lofted its multi-passenger payload during a flight sequence lasting 1 hour, 37 minutes.
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