Science Payloads Set for Launch Aboard CRS-12 Mission

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla., August 8, 2017 (CASIS PR) The SpaceX Falcon 9 vehicle is poised to launch its 12th cargo resupply mission (CRS-12) to the International Space Station (ISS) no earlier than August 13th, 2017 from Kennedy Space Center Launch Pad 39A.

The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft will carry more than 20 ISS National Laboratory payloads to conduct research across a variety of areas aimed at improving life on Earth, including research on Parkinson’s disease, new anti-bacterial compounds, new approaches to treating blood pressure, and pioneering new advances in the use of stem cells for repairing damage from disease, among many others. Thus far in 2017, the ISS National Lab has sponsored more than 100 separate experiments that have reached the station.

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Researchers to Test How Solids Dissolve in Space

The experiment module provides a field of view of six mixing vials at a time. (Credit: Zin Technologies)
The experiment module provides a field of view of six mixing vials at a time. (Credit: Zin Technologies)

HOUSTON (NASA PR) — Anyone who has been sick before knows you want relief as quickly as possible. An investigation soon taking place aboard the International Space Station could help bring that relief by improving design of tablets used to deliver medicine into the human body. The Hard to Wet Surfaces research looks at liquid-solid interactions and how certain pharmaceuticals dissolve, which may lead to more potent and effective medicines in space and on Earth.

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Scientists See the Details with High-Resolution Crystals

Multi-chamber crystallization plate with porous plastic inserts placed in the precipitant reservoirs to reduce wicking. (Credit: Kristofer Gonzalez-DeWhitt)
Multi-chamber crystallization plate with porous plastic inserts placed in the precipitant reservoirs to reduce wicking. (Credit: Kristofer Gonzalez-DeWhitt)

HOUSTON (NASA PR) — Protein crystals tend to grow larger and more perfectly in space than on Earth, where gravity and other forces interfere. For scientists studying protein crystal structures, the difference is like watching high-definition television on a large screen versus standard-definition on a tiny screen.

“If you’re watching a hockey game on a small screen at low resolution, you can see the players and hockey sticks and maybe, just maybe, the puck moving around,” said Kristofer Gonzalez-DeWhitt, a scientist at Eli Lilly and Company. “But in high resolution on a large screen, you can see sweat on a player’s face.”

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