Colorado School of Mines Receives $2.5 Million for 3D Metal Printing Consortium

This rocket engine fuel pump has hundreds of parts including a turbine that spins at over 90,000 rpms. This turbopump was made with additive manufacturing and had 45 percent fewer parts than pumps made with traditional manufacturing. It completed testing under flight-like conditions at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. (Credits: NASA/MSFC)
This rocket engine fuel pump has hundreds of parts including a turbine that spins at over 90,000 rpms. This turbopump was made with additive manufacturing and had 45 percent fewer parts than pumps made with traditional manufacturing. It completed testing under flight-like conditions at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. (Credits: NASA/MSFC)

GOLDEN, Colo., Dec. 14, 2015 – Mechanical Engineering Assistant Professors Aaron Stebner and Douglas Van Bossuyt were awarded a $2.5 million Advanced Industries Accelerator grant from the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade (OEDIT) to establish a 3D metal printing research consortium.

Mines is building out 2200 sq. ft. of dedicated laboratory space in the new Coorstek Center for Applied Science and Engineering for the consortium, while industry members Lockheed Martin, Ball Aerospace, Fauston Tool and Manufacturer’s Edge, are providing more than $4.5M of initial investment in the program. The combination of funds will help position Colorado as the leader in the advancement of standardization, qualification, and intelligent digitization of 3D metal printing.

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Colorado and Hawaii Universities to Research Space Settlement

The Colorado School of Mines and the University of Hawaii at Hilo will be teaming up to conduct joint research work on how humans can learn to live on other worlds, the Associated Press reports.

The Colorado School of Mines Center for Space Resources is working with Lockheed Martin on how to produce oxygen from lunar soil. The Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems in Hilo focuses on developing new technologies for future space explorers and settlers.

“The number of Hawaii students interested in space exploration is rapidly growing. We welcome the opportunity to be a part of information and education exchanges like this one,” University of Hawaii at Hilo Chancellor Rose Tseng said in a statement.