NASA TV to Air SpaceX Cargo Dragon Departure from Space Station

The SpaceX Cargo Dragon spacecraft is set to depart the International Space Station on Friday, Jan. 21, for a splashdown Saturday, Jan. 22, off the coast of Florida. (Credits: NASA)

HOUSTON (NASA PR) — A SpaceX Dragon cargo resupply spacecraft is set to depart the International Space Station Friday, Jan. 21. NASA Television, the agency’s website, and the NASA app will provide live broadcast of the spacecraft’s undocking and departure beginning at 10:15 a.m. EST.

Ground controllers at SpaceX in Hawthorne, California, will send commands at 10:40 a.m. for Dragon to undock from the space-facing port of the station’s Harmony module and fire its thrusters to move a safe distance away from the station. Controllers will command a deorbit burn the following day.

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Six DreamUp Payloads Launch on SpaceX’s CRS-24 Mission to the International Space Station

A SpaceX Dragon resupply spacecraft launches on a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy for the company’s 24th commercial resupply services mission for NASA. (Credits: NASA)

SPOCS team members from NASA, DreamUp, and Nanoracks with the University of Idaho and Columbia University SPOCS teams at the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA Kennedy Space Center

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla., December 21, 2021 (DreamUp PR – At 5:07 AM ET today, Tuesday, December 21st, the 24th cargo resupply mission from SpaceX lifted off carrying six student experiments from DreamUp in its Dragon capsule, alongside about 6,500 pounds of cargo, equipment, experiments, and supplies for the crew on board the International Space Station. DreamUp, the leader in space-based educational offerings, is proud to support these educational payloads from student researchers around the world. The Cargo Dragon is scheduled to berth to the Space Station on Wednesday, December 22, 2021.

This morning’s mission included three student Mixstix experiments supported by the Ramon Foundation and developed by students at Tichon Hadash in Tel Aviv, Shimon Ben Zvi in Givatayim, and Amit Zefat Yeshive in Tzfat. The experiments examine the effects of microgravity on the degradation of plastic by bacteria, the response of a community of intestinal microbes to antibiotics, the effect of Moringa seed powder and copper pieces on E. coli cultures, and the effect of a technique that enhances or inhibits gene expression in certain cells, called transfection, on the rate of drug delivery into lung cancer cells via a technology called Nano-ghosts. The Ramon Foundation is also preparing for the launch of the next Israeli astronaut to the Space Station in 2022.

The first two Nanolab payloads from the Student Payload Opportunities with Citizen Science (SPOCS) also launched on this mission. This program, supported by STEM Earth at the NASA Johnson Space Center and conducted in coordination with Nanoracks, is an opportunity for five Artemis Generation university student teams to conduct research on the International Space Station. Each student team was also tasked with engaging their local community through citizen science and outreach. The University of Idaho’s Vandal Voyagers launched an investigation entitled “Bacteria Resistant Polymers in Microgravity,” and Columbia University’s Columbia Space Initiative launched “Characterizing Antibiotic Resistance in Microgravity Environments (CARMEn).”

The final DreamUp investigation launched on SpaceX CRS-24 is a 1U Nanolab developed by Aurora, d.o.o., which is conducting the experiment as part of the larger Qucopartex project in collaboration with students and the biotechnical faculty at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. “Qucopartex 22” is an investigation studying how exposure to space affects various materials such as high-quality beryl and volcanic glass pebbles.

Lauren Milord, Director of Programs at DreamUp said, “DreamUp is honored to support student research from a broad range of learners, from elementary school to university, and from the United States to Israel and Slovenia. As the low Earth orbit economy rapidly develops, it is critical to provide opportunities for students to develop real-world STEM skills today so they can be tomorrow’s innovators.”

These launch opportunities were made possible via our partnership with Nanoracks and its Space Act Agreement with NASA.

For additional media inquiries, please email us at info@dreamup.org, and for continued updates, be sure to follow @DreamUp_Space on Twitter and Instagram.

About DreamUp

Based in Washington, DC, DreamUp is the first company bringing space into the classroom and the classroom into space. Uniquely positioned to inspire kids globally and engage them through scientific discoveries in space, DreamUp aims to foster an educational community where space-based research and projects will be available to all learners of all ages. DreamUp has a proven track record with more than 500 student research payloads from around the world launched on SpaceX and Northrop Grumman rockets to the International Space Station via a partnership with Nanoracks and its Space Act Agreement with NASA. For more information, visit  https://www.dreamup.org/.

SpaceX Notches 100th First Stage Landing, Sets New Annual Launch Record

A SpaceX Dragon resupply spacecraft launches on a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy for the company’s 24th commercial resupply services mission for NASA. (Credits: NASA)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. (SpaceX PR) — On December 21, 2021, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket launched Dragon on the 24th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-24) mission for NASA from historic Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, completing our 31st and final launch of the year. Dragon separated from Falcon 9’s second stage about twelve minutes after liftoff and will autonomously dock to the space station on Wednesday, December 22.

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Cargo Dragon Docks to Station with Brand New Science

The space station is viewed from the SpaceX Cargo Dragon during its automated approach before docking. (Credit: NASA TV)

HOUSTON (NASA PR) — While the International Space Station was traveling more than 260 miles over the South Pacific Ocean, a SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft autonomously docked to the space-facing side of the orbiting laboratory’s Harmony module at 3:41 a.m. EST, Wednesday, Dec. 22. NASA astronauts Raja Chari and Thomas Marshburn were monitoring docking operations for Dragon.

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Experiments Riding 24th SpaceX Cargo Mission to Space Station Study Bioprinting, Crystallization, Laundry

ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer is shown during preflight training for the BioPrint First Aid investigation, which tests a bioprinted tissue patch for enhanced wound healing. (Credits: ESA)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. (NASA PR) — The 24thSpaceX cargo resupply services mission, targeted to launch in late December from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carries scientific research and technology demonstrations to the International Space Station. The experiments aboard include studies of bioprinting, crystallization of monoclonal antibodies, changes in immune function, plant gene expression changes, laundering clothes in space, processing alloys, and student citizen science projects.

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Crew-3 Astronauts Launch to Space Station Alongside Microgravity Research

SpaceX Crew-3 astronauts (from left) Matthias Maurer, Thomas Marshburn, Raja Chari, and Kayla Barron pose for a portrait during preflight training at SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, Calif. (Credit: SpaceX)

HOUSTON (NASA PR) — NASA’s SpaceX Crew-3 mission is set to launch four astronauts to the International Space Station aboard a SpaceX Crew Dragon on Sunday, Oct. 31. The mission includes three NASA astronauts – mission Commander Raja Chari, Pilot Tom Marshburn, and Mission Specialist Kayla Barron – as well as ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Matthias Maurer, who will also serve as a mission specialist.

Aboard Dragon with the crew will be more than 400 pounds of supplies and hardware, including over 150 pounds of which they will use to conduct experiments aboard the space station. Here is some of the research riding with them into low-Earth orbit.

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SpaceX CRS-23 Successfully Completes Mission, Returning Critical Science Back to Earth

Cargo Dragon CRS-23 atop a Falcon 9 booster. (Credit: SpaceX)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER (FL), October 1, 2021 (CASIS PR)  – On September 30, SpaceX completed its 23rd Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) mission to the International Space Station (ISS) when its Dragon spacecraft safely splashed into the water off the coast of Florida. SpaceX CRS-23, contracted by NASA, brought back more than 25 payloads representing science and technology demonstrations sponsored by the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory. These investigations aim to leverage the unique space-based environment of the orbiting platform to bring value to our nation and drive a robust market in low Earth orbit.

Below highlights some of the ISS National Lab-sponsored investigations that returned on SpaceX CRS-23.

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SpaceX CRS-23 Dragon Returns Experiments on Brain, Muscles, Liver to Earth

Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide works aboard the International Space Station. (Credit: NASA)

by Melissa Gaskill
International Space Station Program Research Office

HOUSTON — The 23rd SpaceX commercial resupply services mission returned samples from scientific experiments on the International Space Station. Back on Earth, scientists anticipate quick access to their experiments for additional observations and analyses.

Dragon undocked from the space station Sept. 30 and and splashed down near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida in the evening.

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Space BD Strengthening Relationship with the Australian Space Industry to Promote the Space Business in Australia

Two Australian academic satellites successfully launched on August 29

TOKYO — Space BD, a leading Japanese space startup, announces the launch of two Australian satellites through Space BD’s small satellite deployment service on August 29, 2021 at 3:14 a.m. (EDT). Space BD has been appointed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) as the private partner for the small satellite deployment service from the International Space Station (ISS) Japanese Experiment Module Kibo since 2018. And it has led to the commercialization of Japanese space assets as a private sector.

This was the first satellite launch for the State of Western Australia, the first satellite launch for of the Australian Research Council Training Centre for CubeSats, Uncrewed Aerial Vehicles and their Applications (CUAVA), and the first overseas satellite launch for Space BD.

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Cargo Dragon Docks with International Space Station

Credit: NASA

HOUSTON (NASA PR) — While the International Space Station was traveling about 260 miles over the Western Australia, a SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft autonomously docked to the forward-facing port of the orbiting laboratory’s Harmony module at 10:30 a.m. EDT, Monday, Aug. 30. Flight Engineers Shane Kimbrough and Megan McArthur of NASA monitored operations.

Among the science experiments Dragon is delivering to the space station are:

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Cutting-Edge Science Launches on NASA’s SpaceX Cargo Resupply Mission

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, topped with the uncrewed Dragon spacecraft, soars upward after lifting off from NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A in Florida at 3:14 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 29, 2021. Dragon will deliver new science investigations, supplies, and equipment to the International Space Station for NASA and SpaceX’s 23rd commercial resupply services mission. (Credits: NASA/Kim Shiflett)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. (NASA PR) — The latest SpaceX Dragon resupply spacecraft is bound for the International Space Station after launching at 3:14 a.m. EDT Sunday on a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying more than 4,800 pounds of science experiments, crew supplies, and spacecraft hardware.

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SpaceX Set to Launch Cargo Dragon Vehicle to ISS on Saturday Morning

Cargo Dragon CRS-23 atop a Falcon 9 booster. (Credit: SpaceX)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. (SpaceX PR) — SpaceX is targeting Saturday, August 28 for Dragon’s launch of its 23rd Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-23) mission. Liftoff is targeted for 3:37 a.m. EDT, or 7:37 UTC, from Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. A backup launch opportunity is available on Sunday, August 29 at 3:14 a.m. EDT, or 7:14 UTC.

Falcon 9’s first stage booster previously supported SpaceX’s Crew-1 and Crew-2 missions, which launched astronauts to the International Space Station, and launch of SXM-8. Following stage separation, SpaceX will land Falcon 9’s first stage on the “A Shortfall of Gravitas” droneship, which will be located in the Atlantic Ocean.

The Dragon spacecraft supporting this mission previously supported SpaceX’s 21st Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-21) mission. Dragon will separate from Falcon 9’s second stage about twelve minutes after liftoff and autonomously dock to the space station on Sunday, August 29 at approximately 11:00 a.m. EDT, 15:00 UTC.

You can watch the live launch webcast starting about 15 minutes before liftoff. 

SpaceX CRS-23 to Launch Multiple ISS National Lab-Sponsored Investigations Into Low Earth Orbit

The International Space Station, photographed by ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli following the undocking of his Soyuz-TMA on 23 May 2011. (Credit: ESA/NASA)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER (FL), August 24, 2021 (CASIS PR) – In the early morning of Saturday, August 28, SpaceX intends to launch its 23rd Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) mission to the International Space Station (ISS). The mission, launching from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center no earlier than 3:37 a.m. EDT, will send more than 4,800 pounds of critical supplies and research to the orbiting laboratory. Among the cargo flying on SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft are more than a dozen payloads sponsored by the ISS U.S. National Laboratory, including physical and life sciences investigations, technology demonstrations, and student-led experiments.

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Making Space-Based Research More Affordable—With a Little Help From the Girl Scouts

The SpaceX Cargo Dragon vehicle is pictured docked to the Harmony module’s space-facing international docking adapter. (Credit: NASA TV)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla,, August 25, 2021 (CASIS PR) – Using ants, plants, and even brine shrimp, a group of Girl Scouts will be among the first researchers to help test a new autonomous research platform on the International Space Station (ISS) that is helping to expand the affordability of microgravity research. 

The Faraday Research Facility, developed by ISS U.S. National Laboratory Commercial Service Provider ProXopS, LLC., will launch on SpaceX’s upcoming 23rd Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) mission. If validated, the platform—capable of housing up to 12 remotely operated “microlab” experiments—could provide a cost- and resource-effective way to transport, conduct, and return spaceflight investigations.  

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