Roscosmos CEO Rogozin Threatens Bulgaria with Nuclear Attack

Roscosmos head Dmitry Rogozin. (Credit: A. Savin)

Sounding more unhinged by the day, Roscosmos CEO Dmitry Rogozin threatened Bulgaria with a nuclear strike as the Russian invasion of Ukraine escalated. Novinite reports:

“This is what Sarmat is good for. It will not ask for consent for the flight from the cowardly Bulgarians, the vicious Romanians and the Montenegrins who betrayed our common history. Like the other various nations like the Swedes.”

This was written on Twitter by the former Deputy Prime Minister of Russia and CEO of Roscosmos Dmitry Rogozin on the occasion of Bulgaria’s refusal to provide an air corridor for a government plane to Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov.

The RS-28 Sarmat, better known as “Satan II”, is a super-heavy intercontinental ballistic missile for carrying nuclear warheads. Its range is 18,000 kilometers.

This is the first direct threat made by the Russian authorities to Bulgaria since the beginning of the Russian invasion of Ukraine on February 24.

The article goes on to say that Bulgaria, Montenegro and North Macedonia had refused permission for Lavrov’s plane to fly to the Serbian capital of Belgrade. Deputy Speaker of the Upper House of the Russian Parliament Konstantin Kosachov blamed the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) for the refusal, saying the three nation’s didn’t refuse permission on their own.

Meanwhile, Russian President Vladimir Putin threatened to strike “new targets” over the U.S. decision to supply rockets to Ukraine. Reuters reports:

President Vladimir Putin warned the United States in an interview broadcast on Sunday that Russia would strike new targets if the West supplied longer-range missiles to Ukraine for use in high-precision mobile rocket systems.

The United States has ruled out sending its own or NATO forces to Ukraine but Washington and its European allies have supplied weapons to Kyiv such as drones, Howitzer heavy artillery, anti-aircraft Stinger and anti-tank Javelin missiles.

President Joe Biden last week said Washington would supply Ukraine with M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems, or HIMARS, after he received assurances from Kyiv that it would not be used to target Russia.

Putin said the arms shipments were “nothing new” and changed nothing but cautioned that there would be a response if the United States supplied longer-range munitions for the HIMARS systems which have a maximum range of up to 300 km (185 miles) or more.

Putin didn’t identify any of the new targets that Russia would attack.