Report: Soyuz Suffered Anomaly While Returning to Earth

NASA astronaut Anne McClain is assisted out of the Soyuz MS-11 that returned her and crewmates Oleg Kononenko of the Russian space agency Roscosmos and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency back to Earth on June 24, 2019, landing in a remote area near Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, after 204 days aboard the International Space Station. (Credits: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

RussianSpaceWeb.com reports that the Soyuz returning three astronauts back from a six-months stay aboard the International Space System suffered an anomaly. The problem occurred after the Soyuz spacecraft fired its main SKD engine in a deorbit maneuver.

Moments after the completion of the braking maneuver, the emergency signal was heard inside the Descent Module and the communications between the crew and mission control discussed a failure of the first manifold in the integrated propulsion system of the Soyuz spacecraft and the switch to the second manifold. Kononenko first reported K1B (Manifold DPO-B) emergency at 05:02:54 Moscow Time and subsequently confirmed a switch to the second manifold. NASA later confirmed the problem, but did not provide any details.

Manifod DPO-B provides fuel to 12 thrusters that steer the Soyuz spacecraft. It is not clear how serious the failure was, or whether it has occurred on previous missions.

RussianSpaceWeb.com reported that the Soyuz subsequently split into the separate modules as planned. The habitation module carrying Russian Commander Oleg Kononenko, American Anne McClain and Canadian David Saint-Jacques reentered the atmosphere and touched down safely in Kazakhstan.