NASA, Partners Seek Input on Standards for Deep Space Technologies

This image shows the far side of the moon, illuminated by the sun, as it crosses between the DSCOVR spacecraft’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) camera and telescope, and the Earth – one million miles away. (Credits: NASA/NOAA)

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) — In order to maximize investment in, and benefits of, future deep space exploration platforms and technologies, NASA and its International Space Station partners have collaborated to draft standards that address seven priority areas in which technology compatibility is crucial for global cooperation.

The agency and its partners are seeking feedback on these draft interoperability standards, which cover: avionics, communications, environmental control and life support systems, power systems, rendezvous operations, robotics, and thermal systems. This standardization effort aims to support commonality without dictating design features beyond the interfaces that allow hardware systems to operate with each other.

“Contributions from the global community will improve the quality of the interoperability standards and help enable development of the systems necessary to meet global exploration goals,” said William Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. “Having compatible hardware will allow differing designs to operate with each other. This could allow for crew rescue missions and support from any spacecraft built to these standards.”

The goal is to provide a final, baseline version of the standards in the summer 2018 timeframe. The first potential application of these standard may be the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway, NASA’s lunar outpost that will extend human presence in deep space. However, the standards are meant to be applicable to all deep space environments.

These interoperability standards will build upon the successful global collaboration that went into developing the International Docking System Standard – the standard used for the International Space Station – which provides a path for government and commercial entities alike to develop a docking system compatible with others.

For more about the deep space interoperability standards, visit:

https://www.internationaldeepspacestandards.com

  • windbourne

    Love it.
    This is exactly what NASA should be doing. Getting standards set and then using them.
    1 thing that snc did that was smart was to have life support in a separate craft. It makes scaling and replacing easier. Hopefully, NASA makes it easy to just plug-in to a habitat and go.

  • Michael Halpern

    Of course having built in life support like the B330 has isn’t a bad idea either, the way i see it a separate life support could be designed as primary, closed loop and built in can be used for auxillary or short term systems

  • windbourne

    Not a bad point. Kind of like the tug engines on the Russian side of ISS.
    Gives u a backup.
    The issue with the b330 is that you still have seerate power/thermal. With snc design, u can put solar/battery/thermal/HVAC/life support all in one unit and then attach them to separate berthing ports. They would have to deal with solar aiming at sun, but still possible.

  • Michael Halpern

    Both are designed for modular construction, provided compatibility, you can add additional dedicated modules to them, the advantages of all in one systems come down to earlier start of operation, redundancy and advantages that come from that, dedicated modules can provide for more capable, sophisticated systems and will certainly make things easier as you get bigger or farther out

  • P.K. Sink

    …The first potential application of these standard may be the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway, NASA’s lunar outpost that will extend human presence in deep space. However, the standards are meant to be applicable to all deep space environments…

    This is so refreshing. There was very little of this kind of planning with the last administration. I will give them credit for including ESA in the Orion program. It’s just hard to get excited about that money pit.

  • Andrew_M_Swallow

    I hope these standards are sufficiently general purpose that they can be used when constructing habitats. A 120V power supply should not give many design problems. A small life support system may fit in a manned rover.

  • Michael Halpern

    Last admin the big thing was getting rid of constellation and promoting crs, ccp and such

  • windbourne

    Yeah, but it makes far more sense to be DC, instead of AC.
    As to small life support, which parts?

  • Andrew_M_Swallow

    > As to small life support, which parts?

    What ever part are needed for a manned rover to go on a 2 week mission. That is similar to the needs of a capsule.

  • P.K. Sink

    Nope. The big thing was the JOURNEY TO MARS.

  • Michael Halpern

    Dsg was specifically designed to be compatible with lunar objectives, Mars was not going to happen during Obama’s administration, it was and still is a stretch goal, the immediate plans were about sustainable space,