Administration Resubmits Bridenstine Nomination to Run NASA

Rep. Jim Bridenstine

The Trump Administration has resubmitted the nomination of Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-OK) to serve as administrator of NASA. The administration also submitted the name of Jeffrey DeWit to serve as the space agency’s chief financial officer.

Bridenstine had a contentious confirmation hearing last year before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, which narrowly confirmed the nomination along party lines. The re-submission of his nomination was a routine matter because the full Senate failed to vote on the nomination before the year ended.

Democrats criticized Bridenstine over his positions on Earth science research, global warming and various social issues. Sens. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) and Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) has expressed opposition to Bridenstine, saying they have concerns about placing a politician in charge of an agency that has enjoyed bi-partisan support.

Republicans enjoy a 51-49 majority in the Senate. Vice President Mike Pence has the power to break 50-50 ties.

  • Robert G. Oler

    he is still unqualified

  • duheagle

    No, he’s not. Whether he’ll be any good is still, obviously, an open question. I’m cautiously optimistic. But, if things go as I hope over the next few years, what NASA does or doesn’t do will become steadily less important and so will the particular person who runs the place.

  • Robert G. Oler

    nothing happens without federal money…and yes he is unqualified…he cannot name when SLS is finished what date how much money

  • duheagle

    Nobody knows when SLS is going to be done, if ever. I guess that means we should leave the post of NASA Administrator vacant as there are no suitable candidates.

  • Robert G. Oler

    nope the answer is we need an administrator that will take control of either finishing it or cancelling it

  • duheagle

    Should Mr. Bridenstine get the job, as I expect to be the case, the degree, if any, to which e can influence the completion of SLS would certainly be one of the contributors to his final grade as NASA Administrator. But the NASA Administrator doesn’t actually have the power to cancel SLS.

  • Tom Billings

    “nope the answer is we need an administrator that will take control of either finishing it or cancelling it”

    And thus kill a NASA that can no longer get its budget through its Senate or House funding committees? The SLS/Orion coalition wants funding to continue into their districts without their sainted selves having to lay out political capital for passing funding for 20 competently conceived smaller line item NASA tech development projects to replace SLS. I’d rather some other solution was raised, because yours will sink NASA in a suicide dash at the LBJians on the funding committees in the House and Senate. I have always hated the high agency costs of NASA’s funding hierarchy, but I won’t just pretend they do not exist.

  • Robert G. Oler

    there is no space future with SLS

  • Robert G. Oler

    he has the power to go to the President and suggest that

  • Tom Billings

    Yes, he does, and the Committee Chairs have the power to tell Trump to go fly a kite. If Trump wants any NASA budget at all, they will insist their moster pork pie be included in it.

  • Tom Billings

    Not for NASA, not until NASA abandons an already flying SLS, yes. Since the last 70 years have seen Congress craft an aerospace industry where the major profit center, and the major conduit for money to Congress members’ constituents, is R&D, not production, then the low costs of New Glenn, BFR/BFS, and space manufacturing will sink SLS expendables once SLS is in production, but not the R&D phase.

    The reusables will launch equipment the diameter of SLS at 5% of its costs. The fact that privately financed orbiting factories can build a 100m+ space telescope for <1 percent of what it takes to launch it from Earth will certainly kill SLS, but not until those factories are already in orbit, serving private markets, without funding from Congress.